What is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

hamlet and ophelia's relationship by Grace LaFortune on Prezi

what is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

How does Hamlet really feel about Ophelia? (1) Hamlet was at one time sincerely and ardently in love with Ophelia. .. Hamlet's Relationship with the Ghost. Get an answer for 'Why did the relationship between Hamlet and Ophelia break down?' and find homework help for other Hamlet questions at eNotes. He seeks revenge for the murder of his father and has to deal with the incestuous relationship between his mother and uncle. When Polonius and Claudius decide to test Hamlet’s madness through Ophelia, he confesses he once loved her; only to immediately contradict himself.

Hamlet's Love for Ophelia

Get Access The Relationship Between Hamlet and Ophelia Melancholy, grief, and madness have pervaded the works of a great many playwrights, and Shakespeare is not an exception.

The mechanical regularities of such emotional maladies as they are presented within Hamlet, not only allow his audience to sympathize with the tragic prince Hamlet, but to provide the very complexities necessary in understanding the tragedy of his lady Ophelia as well.

Hamlet provides his own self-torture and does fall victim to melancholia and grief, however, his madness is feigned. They each share a common connection: Hamlet loses his father as a result of a horrible murder, as does Ophelia.

In her situation is more severe because it is her lover who murders her father and all of her hopes for her future as well. Ultimately, it is also more detrimental to her c! In Act 3, scene 1, line 91 Hamlet begins with his malicious sarcasm toward her.

Before this scene, he has heard the King and Polonius establishing a plan to deduce his unusual and grief-stricken behavior. Hamlet is well aware that this plan merely uses Ophelia as a tool, and as such, she does not have much option of refusing without angering not only her busybody father but the conniving King as well.

Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia

Hamlet readily refuses that he cared for her. For example, his behaviour at the play-scene seems to me to show an intention to hurt and insult; but in the Nunnery-scene which cannot be discussed briefly he is evidently acting a part and suffering acutely, while at the same time his invective, however exaggerated, seems to spring from real feelings; and what is pretence, and what sincerity, appears to me an insoluble problem.

Something depends here on the further question whether or no Hamlet suspects or detects the presence of listeners; but, in the absence of an authentic stage tradition, this question too seems to be unanswerable. But something further seems to follow from the considerations adduced. Hamlet's love, they seem to show, was not only mingled with bitterness, it was also, like all his healthy feelings, weakened and deadened by his melancholy.

But it was not an absorbing passion; it did not habitually occupy his thoughts; and when he declared that it was such a love as forty thousand brothers could not equal, he spoke sincerely indeed but not truly. What he said was true, if I may put it thus, of the inner healthy self which doubtless in time would have fully reasserted itself; but it was only partly true of the Hamlet whom we see in the play.

what is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

And the morbid influence of his melancholy on his love is the cause of those strange facts, that he never alludes to her in his soliloquies, and that he appears not to realise how the death of her father must affect her. The facts seem almost to force this idea on us. That it is less 'romantic' than the popular view is no argument against it. And psychologically it is quite sound, for a frequent symptom of such melancholy as Hamlet's is a more or less complete paralysis, or even perversion, of the emotion of love.

And yet, while feeling no doubt that up to a certain point it is true, I confess I am not satisfied that the explanation of Hamlet's silence regarding Ophelia lies in it. And the reason of this uncertainty is that scarcely any spectators or readers of Hamlet notice this silence at all; that I never noticed it myself till I began to try to solve the problem of Hamlet's relation to Ophelia; and that even now, when I read the play through without pausing to consider particular questions, it scarcely strikes me.

Now Shakespeare wrote primarily for the theatre and not for students, and therefore great weight should be attached to the immediate impressions made by his works. And so it seems at least possible that the explanation of Hamlet's silence may be that Shakespeare, having already a very difficult task to perform in the soliloquies -- that of showing the state of mind which caused Hamlet to delay his vengeance -- did not choose to make his task more difficult by introducing matter which would not only add to the complexity of the subject but might, from its 'sentimental' interest, distract attention from the main point; while, from his theatrical experience, he knew that the audience would not observe how unnatural it was that a man deeply in love, and forced not only to renounce but to wound the woman he loved, should not think of her when he was alone.

But, as this explanation is no more completely convincing to me than the other, I am driven to suspend judgment, and also to suspect that the text admits of no sure interpretation. But it must be remembered that if we could see a contemporary representation of Hamlet, our doubts would probably disappear.

The actor, instructed by the author, would make it clear to us by looks, tones, gestures, and by-play how far Hamlet's feigned harshness to Ophelia was mingled with real bitterness, and again how far his melancholy had deadened his love.

what is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

Such an act That blurs the grace and blush of modesty, Calls virtue hypocrite, takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love And sets a blister there. There are signs that Hamlet was haunted by the horrible idea that he had been deceived in Ophelia as he had been in his mother; that she was shallow and artificial, and even that what had seemed simple and affectionate love might really have been something very different.

The grossness of his language at the play-scene, and some lines in the Nunnery-scene, suggest this; and, considering the state of his mind, there is nothing unnatural in his suffering from such a suspicion. I do not suggest that he believed in it, and in the Nunnery-scene it is clear that his healthy perception of her innocence is in conflict with it. He seems to have divined that Polonius suspected him of dishonourable intentions towards Ophelia; and there are also traces of the idea that Polonius had been quite ready to let his daughter run the risk as long as Hamlet was prosperous.

But it is dangerous, of course, to lay stress on inferences drawn from his conversations with Polonius. Many readers and critics imagine that Hamlet went straight to Ophelia's room after his interview with the Ghost. But we have just seen that on the contrary he tried to visit her and was repelled, and it is absolutely certain that a long interval separates the events of I.

They think also, of course, that Hamlet's visit to Ophelia was the first announcement of his madness.

Hamlet – in 4 Minutes

So, Hamlet hurts Ophelia as much as he confesses his love, how can he do that if he truly loves her? All those encounters with Ophelia happen under unfortunate conditions.

what is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

Additionally, he cannot be honest with Ophelia as he must know of her obedience to her father Polonius and has to maintain his madness-cover. With regard to this, one could argue that Ophelia joining a nunnery would keep her safe and away from the court, as Hamlet does not and cannot know how his plans for revenge will play out.

His hostile attitude towards her can thus be seen as an attempt to alienate her, again, to have her out of the way for his more imminent goal of avenging the murder of his father. She believes to have lost Hamlet to madness, reversing the effect intended y him.

what is the relationship between hamlet and ophelia

To make things worse, she loses him also physically when he is sent to England as a result of him killing Polonius, her beloved father.